The smartests cities in the World (from Forbes)

http://www.forbes.com/entrepreneurs/2006/12/14/boulder-education-cities-ent_cx_ee_1215smartcities.html
http://www.forbes.com/entrepreneurs/2006/12/14/boulder-education-cities-ent_cx_ee_1215smartcities_slides.html
America’s 10 smartest cities,
“ranked them based on the percentage of the population age 25 and over
with at least a bachelors degree”.
1. Boulder, CO
2. Bethesda, MD
3. Ann Arbor, MI
4. Cambridge, MA
5. San Francisco, CA
6. Durham, NC
7. Fort Collins-Loveland, CO
8. Washington, DC
9. Bridgeport, Stamford, and Norwalk, CT
10. San Jose, Sunnyvale, and Santa Clara, CA

I guess New York City and Seattle lose on this criterion.

What bibliometric tool will make my life better

I would like to see some tool that will allow me to manipulate paper references in the following way:

- add a paper in pdf format
- add a reference for which a pdf is not available
- search for papers/references
- manually tag papers by topic and importance
- extract custom bib entries for each topic and export to bibtex and html
- papers can belong to multiple categories
- allow manual and group annotations of papers
- unix based with batch mode capabilities
- incorporate access control
- retrieve papers

I have been unable to find something like this. Any hints?

Drago

Lost in Paris

Look at this map of Paris
http://travel.nytimes.com/2006/12/24/travel/24hours.html
printed in the Dec. 24 issue of the New York Times.

The Champs-Elysées is shown in the wrong place (what is labeled as
“Champs-Elysées” is actually Avenue de Friedland/Boulevard Haussmann).
The Champs-Elysées is the avenue that links Place de l’Etoile to Place
de la Concorde.

http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2006/12/22/travel/escapes/22hour_map.html

Compare with this map:

http://www.frommers.com/images/destinations/maps/jpg-2006/62_thebestofparisin1day.jpg

or this one:

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=paris,+france&ll=48.873861,2.294898&spn=0.006007,0.020548&t=h&hl=en

One can only wonder about the reason for this blunder by the New
York Times – perhaps trying to foil the discovery of the Holy Grail :)

Update (Dec. 30) The NYT web site has been updated with a corrected map showing the Champs-Elysées in the right place.

How to name email attachments

Here is a suggestion. If you send a homework assignment or a resume as
an attachment, please consider that the person receiving it (an
instructor or potential employer) is likely to get such submissions
from other people as well. If you name your submission “HW1.tar.gz” or
“resume.pdf”, chances are that your recipient will have other files
with the same name. It is much better to name your file with some
identifying information about yourself, e.g., your name or user id, e.g., “HW1-CS499-johnson.tar.gz” or “Alice.Smith.resume.pdf”.

A message from the spelling police or “Riding the subway with Verlaine”

NYC subway cars occasionally feature poetry excerpts on the inside
walls. Some are great. I was very pleased to see the beginning of
Verlaine’s “Automn Song” (”Chanson d’Automne”). Unfortunately, the
spelling police discovered a typo: “saglots” instead of “sanglots”.
Here is the full text of this wonderful poem:

Chanson d’Automne

Les sanglots longs
Des violons
De l’automne
Blessent mon coeur
D’une langueur
Monotone.

Tout suffocant
Et blême, quand
Sonne l’heure,
Je me souviens
Des jours anciens
Et je pleure;

Et je m’en vais
Au vent mauvais
Qui m’emporte
Deçà, delà
Pareil à la
Feuille morte.

EU wants Bulgarians to change the way they speak

According to http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=72473 and http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=72419,
the EU wants the pronunciation of EURO in Bulgarian to be made
consistent with the latinized pronunciation (”euro”) instead of the
currently adopted “evro”. What’s next? Change Sofia’s spelling to
Sophia and Bulgaria’s pronunciation in Bulgarian to “bulgaria”?